20th Anniversary
Advertising Campaign

Self-esteem is important to all women, it just happens to be in sharper focus for those who have cancer. That’s the reason Look Good Feel Better exists. We have been helping to combat the visible side effects of cancer treatment for 20 years through free confidence-boosting skincare and make-up Workshops and Masterclasses across the UK.

Beauty isn’t just beauty it’s #Warpaint4life

The #Warpaint4Life campaign celebrates the power of beauty for all women everywhere. To feel confident, in control and empowered in life is every woman’s right and Look Good Feel Better exists to make sure that cancer doesn’t get to take that away.

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Our LGFB #WARPAINT4LIFE Stories

Suzanne

Suzanne

I want people to see me as Suzanne, not cancer. I’m not cancer I want to go out into the street and blend in. Make-up is my warpaint, it sets me up for the day and allows me to be Suzanne.
I’m 41 and live in Northampton with my partner Steve and I have a 25 year old son. I was diagnosed with breast cancer in October 2013 and I had a mastectomy in November. My chemotherapy started in November and I will also be having radiotherapy.

I want people to see me as Suzanne, not cancer. I’m not cancer I want to go out into the street and blend in. Make-up is my warpaint, it sets me up for the day and allows me to be Suzanne.
Behind the ScenesE
Kreena

Kreena

Makeup is like a coat of armour, we’re painting it on to be normal, but you’ve got even more of a battle, every day is more of a battle, so that little bit of armour is even more essential and more crucial to your daily activity.
I was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 33, I've had a left mastectomy and I've just finished chemotherapy and will also be undergoing radiotherapy. I haven’t been that public with my diagnosis and I use make-up to make myself look ‘normal’, it’s really important for me to maintain that sense of normality.

I don’t want to be seen as a victim, if you go out looking unwell people look at you differently and I don’t want that. I’m 34, I still want to look like a 34 year old and not someone who’s had that all taken away from them.

Makeup is like a coat of armour, we’re painting it on to be normal, but you’ve got even more of a battle, every day is more of a battle, so that little bit of armour is even more essential and more crucial to your daily activity.
Behind the ScenesE
Maria

Maria

Before I was diagnosed I didn’t wear a lot of makeup, but my lipstick was my power, my warpaint. If I wanted to cheer myself up, I’d put on a bright red lipstick. Now, post-cancer, eyebrows have become part of my warpaint4life.
I’m 51 and I live in London with my husband and two teenage children. I was diagnosed with breast cancer in October 2013 and underwent surgery in November my treatment plan includes chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

I had long ‘locks’, eyebrows and eyelashes and I lost all of that along with an element of confidence so it then becomes about how people perceive you. You stand out more if you don’t have eyebrows, you’re constantly sweating and you’ve got no hair, sometimes all I want is to look ‘normal’. Why should I have to look like I’ve got cancer? Why shouldn’t I look good and get out there?

It’s more than just putting on your makeup, you’re putting on your persona and you’re fighting back. It’s very difficult to explain to someone who hasn’t been through it, but you do need a little bit more to just feel‘ordinary’.

Before I was diagnosed I didn’t wear a lot of makeup, but my lipstick was my power, my warpaint. If I was going to a meeting or if I wanted to cheer myself up, I’d put on a bright red lipstick. Now, post-cancer, eyebrows have become part of my warpaint4life.
Behind the ScenesE
Ellie

Ellie

Sometimes when I’m sitting at home and feeling unwell, I play around and experiment with my makeup and that makes me feel good, it gives me a real lift.
I’m 19 and I was diagnosed with breast cancer when I was 18, I live in Leeds with my family and I was due to go to university last year but deferred due to my diagnosis.

I decided not to go to university last year as I didn’t want to be the girl with no hair, I wanted to be Ellie.All I want is to be as normal as possible, that’s the main thing, to be normal and the same as everyone else.

Playing around with make-up and trying to appreciate my face – which is all I’ve been left with – makes everything seem a lot easier. Sometimes when I’m sitting at home and feeling unwell, I play around and experiment with my makeup and that makes me feel good, it gives me a real lift.
Behind the ScenesE
The Creative Team

The Creative Team

Our huge thanks go to the incredible team who made the whole campaign possible.
7 after 6 - a team of seven women all working within the advertising industry who worked out of hours, at no charge to us, to create #Warpaint4life. Jo Smith, Nikki Scott, Sian Hughes, Isobel Nelson, Natasha Markley, Jen Crothers, Gina Martin and Helen Brownlie

Bringing the campaign to life were the shoot team who came together, donating their exceptional skills, time and warmth, free of charge one Saturday; Photographer - Josh van Gelder, Producer - Andrea Blood, Make-up Artist - Caroline Barnes and assistant Charleen McGreene, Stylist - Pip Edwards and assistant Kate Adams , Hair - Bjorn Krischker, Lighting – Chris Fairchild, 123 Lighting and ‘Behind the Scenes’ Film - Lucy Blakstad.
Behind the ScenesE